Bring Light to Attics and Bonus Rooms

Bring Natural Light and Ventilation to Attic Rooms with Velux Skylights

Attics and bonus rooms lurk in the darkness in many homes.  But with the additional natural light and fresh air venting skylights or roof windows provide, underutilized, gloomy space can easily become inviting and productive.

“Whether as a playroom, home office, or extra bedroom, finishing or remodeling your bonus room with skylights or roof windows, which open wider to provide egress, may be the highest value, yet lowest cost per square foot option you can choose,” says Joe Patrick, senior product manager for VELUX America.

Patrick says that converting upstairs areas and adding balanced lighting with energy-efficient skylights makes expensive dormers unnecessary.   “Labor and material costs can be reduced,” he says,  “and finished attics and bonus rooms typically appraise at 100 percent of the value of other living space while basements typically do not.”

Patrick points out that another reason to consider skylights is that they admit 30 percent more light than vertical windows in dormers, and provide the drama of a sky view that can’t be achieved with vertical windows.  “And skylights, whether fixed or venting, which can be fitted with interior blinds and shades or exterior awnings, offer much more privacy than vertical windows,” he says.  There are also skylights available with electrochromic glass that can be tinted electronically by remote control to control light and heat gain while still providing the view to the sky, Patrick points out.

For a free in-home evaluation and assistance in choosing the right skylight products to bring additional natural light and ventilation into your home, contact Solar Texas at tony@soltx.com or 210-669-2504.

For government information on window and skylight energy efficiency visit Energy Star  and for independent agency information visit www.nfrc.org or www.efficientwindows.org.

 

 

Solar Texas Installs Velux Sun Tunnels in Scott Felder Homes Model

We recently installed two Velux Sun Tunnels into the Scott Felder Homes model at their new neighborhood north of San Antonio called Valencia Terrace.  This is the third Scott Felder neighborhood in which we are featured.  The model home opened in early June.

 

 

The Photo on the left shows the laundry sorting table, beautifully illuminated with a 14″ Velux Sun Tunnel, while the photo on the right captures the daylight added to the hallway with a 10″ Velux Sun Tunnel.

Want to see another installation example?

Check out our installation photos from Scott Felders’ Sundance Ranch.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See How the Light Improves With a Velux Sun Tunnel

We’ve said it over and over again. Velux Sun Tunnels make a visible difference in lighting up a room.  Here’s another example:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This installation at Cordillera Ranch was part of a home renovation/addition.  The lighting went from 14  foot-candles to 32foot-candles .  This beautiful new bathroom will have more than twice the light without additional energy use in the space. Now that’s a payoff!

Want to know more about how a Velux Sun Tunnel can add light to a room in your home?  Contact Solar Texas today.

Fix Your Leaking Skylight Before the Next Rainstorm

Do you have a leaking skylight due to the recent rains? It’s important to get it fixed because it will just get worse.

I receive phone calls almost immediately after heavy rains about leaking and damaged skylights. There are a multitude of reasons for leaking skylights, but usually it’s just a function of age. Aged sealants that develop cracks are commonplace. Typically, water collects on the upslope side of the skylight on its rush down the roof, seeps in underneath the shingles and then between the skylight base and its seat on the roof sheathing.

From there it typically follows the skylight base around and down the sides and starts leaking in at the downslope edge of the skylight. From there, the water takes one or two paths: either coming into the house on the inside of the skylight tunnel and becoming apparent through drips on the floor and flaking paint and plaster and staining on the drywall; or seeping down the drywall on the attic side of the tunnel and then pooling on the ceiling and becoming apparent through a spreading brown stain on the ceiling near the skylight tunnel.

The first step for the homeowner is to get the source of the leak fixed. If caught early enough, once the leak is fixed, the drywall can be dried out and repainted. The longer the leak is left untreated, the more damage can be expected to the home.

Many budget conscious homeowners and some roofers will take a tube of caulk on the roof and seal around the skylight dome. In the vast majority of incidences, this does nothing to fix the leak. The problem is usually where the skylight meets the roof: under the shingles. The skylight has to be removed and reseated. If the skylight is an acrylic dome skylight and has been on the roof for 10 years or more, then it’s a good opportunity to replace the domes at the same time, so my recommendation is usually to replace the entire skylight.

Solar Texas and Velux Sun Tunnel featured in Scott Felder Model Home

Tony Stephenson outside the Scott Felder Model Home
Solar Texas owner Tony Stephenson at the Scott Felder Model Home in Sundance Ranch.

If you’re looking for a new home that’s beautifully flooded with natural light, then check out the Sundance Ranch community and the Scott Felder Homes new model home at 10407 Willow Bark, Boerne, TX.

Located in the far northwest corner of San Antonio, you can get to Sundance Ranch from Interstate 10 using the Boerne Stage Road exit, past Scenic Loop Café.

The model home features two ten-inch Velux Sun Tunnels.  The first is in the hallway to the left of the main entryway. The second can be found in the main bathroom, just down the hallway.

Adding an energy-efficient Velux Sun Tunnel is a great way to add natural light to your home during the building phase, but it’s equally as easy to retrofit this product into your existing home to add natural light to hallways, bathrooms and closets.

If you’re taking a drive out that way, check out the neighborhood AND the Velux Products.